Planting Bare-Root Roses

  1. Prune the roses properly before planting if the roses have not already been pruned.
  2. Choose a site that gets shelter from the wind and at least six hours of sun each day.
  3. Dig a hole about 2 feet wide and as deep as the longest root. The rose crown must remain 3 to 4 inches above the soil line once the soil has settled
  4. Set soil aside and create a mixture of one-third Bumper Crop or Gold Rush to two-thirds native soil.
  5. Place one-half cup Master Nursery Master Start at the bottom of the hole and mix in well with the soil in the bottom of the hole.
  6. Form a cone by patting handfuls of planting mixture until you form a tepee of soil rising from the hole.
  7. Just before you put the bush in place, trim off any damaged or broken roots. Use sharp shears to make a clean cut into the healthy growth a quarter inch from a break. Some rosarians cut off one-quarter inch of all root tips, claiming that it stimulates growth-probably a good practice.
  8. Place the bush by draping its roots comfortably over the cone. Make sure the bud union is at the right height for the amount of mulch you plan to add. A shovel laid across the hole will help you gauge height.
  9. Holding the bush in place, begin to refill the hole with the soil mixture and pat down with your hands. When the hole is half filled, water to soak. Dry fertilizers should be sprinkled into the half-filled hole and watered into place before the rest of the soil is added.
  10. Construct a berm about 4 inches high around the periphery of the hole. This will facilitate flood irrigation.
  11. Bare-root roses have been dipped in a fungicide before shipping: No need to apply dormant sprays until next season! For growing season sprays, see our Roses Care Guide.

bare root roses

01/05/2017